The “names” on the ancient Greek vases are there for everyone to see, but only the Scythic speaking people can read the hidden message of these scytales! What a revealing name! that goes unnoticed by scientists for two and a half thousand years.The small cup from Corinth (1883 or earlier), now in Paris, Louvre MNC 332, has these “names” added to the boxing scene:
ϜΙΟΚΕ ΠΥΚΤΑ ΦΕΥΓΕ, which reads: VÍ'Ó Ki E'-BUKTA FÉ' VéGE
> Víjó (vívó) ki elbukta fél vége. (The fighter, who lost it, fears his end.)



CONTENTS Amazons & Scythians 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?! Making Sense Kypselos Chest Cretan Hieroglyphs Linear A Sundry MY HUNGARIAN PAGES
   
 
Blog: 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?!
Common sense in nonsense inscriptions VIII

In the last of the “nonsense inscriptions” AVI 7270 talks about brainpower in the healing process, 7348 and 7459 are very clever word plays, while 7361 is a masterpiece: the same inscriptions tells one thing from the mouth of Ajax and another when told by Cassandra. AVI 7580 is a lesson in the warfare against mounted enemy. AVI 7604 is an intriguing strip one only can understand when reading the bubble words, as it with all the cartoons. AVI 7945 is about the talking mythological names like Troilos.

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Keywords : Robert Graves, Greek myths, nonsense vase inscriptions, Ajax, Cassandra, Troilos


Date: 13.06.17. Author: Mihály Mellár Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?!
Common sense in nonsense inscriptions VII

Let us pay attention how well the inscriptions of the depicted scenes from the Greek myths agree with Robert Graves interpretations of those myths on AVI 6031, 6048, 6285, 6291, 6416, 6451, 6458, 6855 and 6989 vases. My readings of the inscriptions are no-nonsense integral parts of the whole communication the craftsmen conveyed to us. AVI 6285 may even settle where the word cockney comes from and what is it original meaning. AVI 6031 clarifies the names of the people in the Theseus myth as Aryans and Ias.

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Keywords : Robert Graves, Greek myths, nonsense vase inscriptions, Aryans, Ias, Ion, Jászok


Date: 31.03.17. Author: Mihály Mellár Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?!
Common sense in nonsense inscriptions VI

These painted and inscribed vases were valued ornaments and/or useful vessels confronted by people again and again, so they are ideal instruments to convey some useful educational thoughts. Indeed, all the inscriptions are sayings, stock phrases (AVI 5266, AVI 5368, AVI 5370, AVI 5900), puns (the Esperente of AVI 5221 is exceptional) and teachings, moral lessons drawn from myths and sagas, such as AVI 5251, which is essential for everyone really interested in understanding these inscriptions. The playful AVI 5258 is also a must.

Read more...
Keywords : Centauromachy, Esperente, Jazygian, Glaukytes potter, Archikles potter, sphinx-griffin


Date: 23.09.16. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?!
Common sense in nonsense inscriptions V

In this section the most noteworthy inscriptions are AVI 4061 and 4107 for their trade instructions; 4089 for its play with letters; 4186 and 4995 for their play with (the same) words. AVI 4276 shows how after its proper reading, an otherwise senseless picture makes perfect sense! AVI 4288 is a hearty reflection, while 4289, 4290 and 4291 are lighter variations on the same theme. AVI 4426 shows that even a “litter of letters” can make perfect sense. AVI 4539 is the highlight of this section: it shows the absurdity of predictions or oracles! If interested where the word krater comes from, read AVI 4613! The inscriptions on AVI 4722 are elevating thoughts indeed.

Read more...
Keywords : Krater, olisboi, maenad, satyr, Olympos, Hermes, Dionysos, Nikai


Date: 20.09.16. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?!
Common sense in nonsense inscriptions IV

This sections shows again how the scientists are missing the most obvious clues to a very simple reading rule applied in these inscriptions. To read these “nonsense” inscriptions one needs only a good dictionary and non chauvinistic, non culturally prejudiced and conceited approach. All the inscriptions perfectly complete and supplement the depicted scenes, but they also stand as morals to keep in mind. Just to illustrate how the text: “λασασα > aLÁSSA' SZÁ' > Alással (alvással) száll. (It (she) flies with sleep.)” completes the picture of a “Nike flying with lyre and phiale.” or look at the scene on AVI 3754a and read the perfectly matching and completing text to it.

Read more...
Keywords : Calydonian Boar Hunt, Ransoming of Hector, Return of Hephaestus


Date: 22.07.16. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?!
Common sense in nonsense inscriptions III

In this section AVI 2141 sheds light on different “miswritten” kalos occurrences for the scientificly minded. For the rest of us AVI 2210 is about a gallant way of courting, AVI 2211 is the birth of Athena with not very welcome comments by the onlookers. AVI 2214 is about destiny and well-wishing. AVI 2261 is about number four (négy) and AVI 2819 spells out number five (öt), while AVI 2289 spells out the depicted KÁKa (bulrush) in Demeter's hand. AVI 2636 sheds light on the real nature of satyrs and maenades. AVI 2677 is for party-goers and AVI 2929 for cheering up with a bit of ancient humour.



Read more...
Keywords : Demeter, Triptolemos, satyrs, maenades, Amazon


Date: 24.03.16. Author: Mellár Mihály Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?!
Common sense in nonsense inscriptions II

In this section the most remarkable inscription is AVI 1436 from the famous Myson potter, a really clever way to say the most in the limited area available for writing. AVI 1937 is an interesting chat on a boar-hunting, with the enlightening moral that the kill should be respected, even if it's only an animal... The sampled out conversation by the scientists on AVI 1978 is still thought-provoking.

Read more...
Keywords : Amazon, Myson potter, Symposium, Calydonian boar-hunting


Date: 24.03.16. Author: Mellár Mihály Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: 'Nonsense Inscriptions'?!
Common sense in nonsense inscriptions I

There are two categories of nonsense inscriptions: those with imitation letterings are real nonsense and not the subject of our attention, but most of the others – which imitate words by using real letters – are actually legible texts that make perfect sense when one fills back the left out vowels by the applied method of writing, the so called defective notation of vowels method, wildly used in the era and area.

Before leaving the page by dismissing the above statement as “nonsense”, please, take a look at inscriptions AVI 5258, AVI 0781, or at the really nonsensical looking AVI 0723. They all make perfect sense by complementing the painting with perfectly fitting descriptions of the scene or with the uttered words of the depicted actors.

Read more...
Keywords : nonsense Attic Vase inscriptions, Henry R. Immerwahr, Scythian texts


Date: 24.03.16. Author: Mellár Mihály Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter XII (Etruria, Achaian and Doric Colonies, Ionic and Doric Islands, Ionic Dodecapolis and Doric Hexapolis)

Even though this is a miscellaneous collection of vases, some inscriptions are quite interesting, such as ETR 1, ACC 3, the wordplay DOC 7, IOI 2, DOI 1 and DOH 3 which describes the shape of the jar it is written on.

Read more...
Keywords : Etrurian, Achaian, Ionic, Doric Vases


Date: 02.03.16. Author: Mellár Mihály Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter XI (‘Chalcidian’ and Pseudo-Chalcidian).

Chalcidian’ is only a ‘school’ of archaic Greek vase-painting with quite a few exiting inscriptions. CHA 11 is especially illuminating, as it makes clear that the basis for the whole Minotaur myth is the headdress with bullhorn and the belonging title of the queen's (ex-)husband. In the Minoan matriarch society, according to Robert Graves, Minos is the queen's husband, serving (mainly) the reproduction of the dynasty for a year, (13 Moon-months) or a long year (100 Moon-months). He functions as MINOS < MŰ-NŐS 'artificially married' and he wears a headdress with bullhorns and (after his disposal) an official title TAUROS < TA-ÚR-ŐS 'last master-father'.

Read more...
Keywords : ‘Chalcidian’, Satyrs, Maenads, Atalante, Peleus, Minos, Tauros


Date: 02.03.16. Author: Mellár Mihály Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter X (Lakonia – Ithaka – Euboian Colonies).

Only a few vases with inscriptions, still some quite interesting readings, such as LAK 3, LAK 4 and ITH 2.

Read more...
Keywords : Lakonia, Ithaka, Euboian Colonies, metrical inscription, Sparta


Date: 02.03.16. Author: Mellár Mihály Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Cretan Hieroglyphs
The Phistos Disc in Retro

With these retrograde readings we can really appreciate the masterpiece of the scribe. In ten different reading directions, stamping 242 impressions of the 45 hieroglyphic seals, the scribe set up 826 words in meaningful sentences on a palm-size disc is a remarkable achievement by all means. To write down this same text in today's Magyar spelling we needed 5123 letters. The Phaistos disc is an all-time high record!

Read more...
Keywords : Phaisztoszi korong, Faisztoszi diszk, Krétai képírás, képjelek


Date: 13.07.11. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Cretan Hieroglyphs
The Phaistos Disc's Readings

The shorter is an unknown writing the harder is to decipher. It is especially hard when a lot of signs turns up just once in the text. On the Phaistos disc out of the 45 signs 9 are such hapaxes. This data is taken as fact by everybody, but the appearance is deceptive. The disc can be read in both directions, so the hapaxes are included into at least two different readings. On top of that, the text, divided into fields, makes up a multiple acrostics. The ten different reading directions provide as many checks on the phonetic values of some signs. The figuring out this multiply interwoven lattice-work of reading directions guided the scribe in choosing the right hieroglyphs. As we can see he made a perfect selection.

Read more...
Keywords : Phaistos disc/disk, decipherment, Cretan hieroglyphs


Date: 13.07.11. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter IX (Pinakes2)

The inscriptions on tablets are dedications as the researchers, including Wachter, have rightly supposed. Most of the tablets have holes through which they were attached, as it turns out by the reading of the dedications, to the offered food-samples such as dishes of quail, duck, heifer, boar, fried meat, rice, millet, or often just named commonly as drink, sweet or fasting food. But the identity of the dedicated, the person(s) or god(s) is very questionable as Poseidon (on the tablets Potida, Poteda, Potda, Poteidan) and Amphitrite (Anphitrita, Afirita, Afitretan) turns out to be fasting food, feast of food-abundance, quail-dish, etc. when read in Scythic-Hun-Hungarian.

In this part only a few tablets are concerned with feasting, the rest are short sayings, signboards and mnemonic tool for the ABC.

Read more...
Keywords : Penteskouphia, pinakes, nonsense inscription, Pitsa


Date: 25.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter VIII (Pinakes1)

“Introduction: In 1879 in a clandestine excavation by farmers near Penteskouphia on the slope of Acrocorinth, several hundred fragments of painted clay tablets were found in what seems to have been a waste deposit. They were illegally sold in Athens and the vast majority went to Berlin where they still are (the rest, viz. sixteen, are in Paris). Wachter

The inscriptions on tablets are dedications as the researchers, including Wachter, have rightly supposed. Most of the tablets have holes through which they were attached, as it turns out by the reading of the dedications, to the offered food-samples such as dishes of quail, duck, heifer, boar, fried meat, rice, millet, or often just named commonly as drink, sweet or fasting food. But the identity of the dedicated, the person(s) or god(s) is very questionable as Poseidon (on the tablets Potida, Poteda, Potda, Poteidan) and Amphitrite (Anphitrita, Afirita, Afitretan) turns out to be fasting food, feast of food-abundance, quail-dish, etc. when read in Scythic-Hun-Hungarian.

Read more...
Keywords : metrical dedication, Poseidon, Amphitrite, pinax


Date: 25.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter VII. (Corinth 5.)

As the Corinthian vase-inscriptions make up quite a large part of Wachter's book, I did break this part up into five subheadings, plus a separate blog for the Kypselos chest, which actually COR 66 in Wächter's book.

In this part COR 107 is interesting for its anti-war sentiment. COR 113 questions the love of the slipping out, “faithful” lover. COR 128 is a clever saying, while COR 131 is a very picturesque prove for the readings I propose here.

Read more...
Keywords : Tydeus, Ismene, Achilleus, Memnon, Antilochos


Date: 21.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter VI. (Corinth 4.)

As the Corinthian vase-inscriptions make up quite a large part of Wachter's book, I did break this part up into five subheadings, plus a separate blog for the Kypselos chest, which actually COR 66 in Wächter's book.

COR 88 has two ligatures (missed by the epigrapher!) in “misspelled labels”, which make perfect sense in the context when read as bubble-words complementing the depicted scene. The reading of COR 92 is perfectly complementing the banquet scene, while COR 104 the boar-hunting scene.

Read more...
Keywords : olpe, quadriga, Thetis, Sphortos, Nereids, Gorgon


Date: 21.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter V. (Corinth 3.)

As the Corinthian vase-inscriptions make up quite a large part of Wachter's book, I did break this part up into five subheadings, plus a separate blog for the Kypselos chest, which actually COR 66 in Wächter's book.

Read more...
Keywords : Trojan war, departure of Paris, mourning of Achilleus


Date: 18.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter IV. (Corinth 2.)

As the Corinthian vase-inscriptions make up quite a large part of Wachter's book, I did break this part up into five subheadings, plus a separate blog for the Kypselos chest, which actually COR 66 in Wächter's book.

Read more...
Keywords : Achilleus, boar-hunt, Agamemnon, Trojan Cycle


Date: 18.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter III. (Corinth 1.)

The main period of Corinthian vase-painting is relatively short, and the inscribed pieces span just over a century, most of them no more than about 30 years (approximately 580–550). Towards the end of the period, Corinthian workshops started imitating Attic fashion.

For the Corinthian alphabet, which is of a common type (similar to East Ionic) but contains a distinctive series of less common letter-forms (mainly beta, iota, san, and the special, though frequent, epsilon).

As the Corinthian vase-inscriptions make up quite a large part of Wachter's book, I did break this part up into five subheadings, plus a separate blog for the Kypselos chest, which actually COR 66 in Wächter's book.  

Read more...
Keywords : Corinthian vases, Hercules' labours, Paris & Helene, wedding


Date: 15.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wachter II. (Aigina and uncertain)

There are few painted and inscribed vases for which we can claim an Aiginetan origin. Their Aiginetan provenance is the primary condition. Only one of these can be deciphered with any certainty. Some other vases are unique in style and cannot be attributed with certainty to any precise place of production, so they are branded as of uncertain origin and added to this heading.

Note INC 1 which is an allegoric message about the danger Egypt creates with her rich rye production.

 

Read more...
Keywords :


Date: 04.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Making Sense
Making Sense after Rudolf Wächter I. (Boiotia)

Rudolf Wächter's book starts out with Euboian painted pottery, but the scanty material available doesn't allow for any reliable readings, so we jump to the Boiotian vases, which offer quite a few significant inscriptions, especially BOI 1A-B and a related graffito makes an interesting reading. Actually, all the inscriptions in this part are very cleverly construed with everlasting moral to draw from their stories.

Read more...
Keywords : Non-Attic, Greek, Vase, Inscriptions, Wächter


Date: 03.07.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Linear A
Reading of Linear A Writings

This introduction to Linear A (LinA) writing is uncommon in all aspects, exactly that makes this new approach to decipherment work. No free rein to esoteric interpretation of symbols, no translation from an exotic language only the decipherer speaks, the whole corpus can be read through with just a handful of simple reading rules – in today’s Magyar. I know how ridiculously this sounds, but let me explain: Magyar is an agglutinative, root-based language, in which hundreds or even thousands of words are derived from the same root-word. If one changes a consonant in the consonantal frame of the root-word, one has to make that same change simultaneously in the whole word-family based on that root-word, or the word-family splits up. As it is impossible to change simultaneously thousands of words, a language is either agglutinative, based on never changing root-words or else. Minoan belonged to this never changing root-based agglutinative languages and lived on in Carian, Lydian, Lucian, Thracian, … to Hungarian languages, which should be called by a common name as Scythian. 

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Keywords : Linear A writing, syllabic writing system, rebus principle, acrophonic principle, logogram, ideogram


Date: 30.06.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Linear A
Pictograms of Linear A writings

LinA (similarly to Minoan hieroglyphic writing) is a phonetic writing system, based on rebus and acrophonic principles in letters, and using defective notation of vowels as the method of writing. Wouldn’t it be highly illogical and ridiculous to represent a “logogram/ideogram” with the depiction of an entirely different commodity, and derive its name by the rebus principle from this other commodity? But this is the case: A commonly used “logogram” is GRA, short for grain, not for the word, but for the commodity itself, the experts are saying. By looking up some of the tablets with this sign on, one would realise that the sign depicts a simply drawn RoSe (RóZSa, in Minoan/Magyar) with its stem and petals, and a horizontal line cutting of the last sound (a returning technique in LinA): RóZSa > RoZS, is the Minoan/Magyar word for rye, indeed a grain.

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Keywords : defective notation of vowels, pictogram, logogram, ideogram


Date: 30.06.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Amazons & Scythians
Making Sense of Nonsense Inscriptions Interpretations Associated with Amazons and Scythians on Athenian Vases

The A. Mayor, J. Colarusso and D. Saunders trio of authors has taken up the task to shed some light on the more than 2000 “nonsense” inscriptions on ancient Greek vases. They investigated the presumptively meaningless strings of Greek letters associated with Scythians and Amazons depicted on the vases, and they deciphered – this is their belief – those inscriptions as “appropriate names and words in ancient forms of Iranian, Abkhazian, Circassian, Ubykh, and Georgian.” But are they right?

Read more...
Keywords : Attic vase inscription, Nonsense inscription, Amazon, Scythian, Greek vases, amphora


Date: 27.06.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Kypselos Chest
Kypselos chest in Olympia and the Amphiaraos krater

The Amphiaraos Krater depicts on the front a frieze of horsemen and above it the departure of Amphiaraos. The back was decorated with a battle frieze, above it again Amphiaraos, this time as a participant in the funeral games of Pelias. Below one of the handles, a wrestling match is depicted. The paintings on the vessel are considered especially colourful and detailed. Thus, the anger in Amphiaraos eye, looking at Eriphyle, his only family member not to wish for his safe return, is visible. A sorrowful seer indicates the imminent death of the hero. The same scene was depicted on the Kypselos chest in Olympia, as described by Pausanias.

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Keywords : column krater, Amphiaraos, Pelias, Kypselos chest, Pausanias, Description of Greece


Date: 27.06.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




Blog: Alphabets
Alphabets

The inscriptions on ancient Greek vases are written by individual handwriting in local variants (Ionian, Corinthian, Lakonian, Etrurian,…) of the alphabet which are transliterated into the standard form to make it easier to follow, which in turn are transcribed into the Magyar ABC for reading of these texts in the form they would be spelled today. The readings are attained with a simple and consistent transliteration of the inscriptions. The applied method of writing is the defective notation of vowels used by all the scripts of the area and era of these writings, such as Carian, Lydian, Lycian, etc. The left out vowels (in small letters) does not make the inscriptions neither illegible nor nonsensical, on the contrary, the presented transliterations with the back-filled left out vowels expressly and eloquently explain and/or complement the depicted scene on the vases.

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Keywords :


Date: 27.06.15. Author: Mihaly Mellar Printable version     Send it to your friend!   Comment the article! 




 
    

  
 
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